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Posts Tagged ‘uvm’

Understanding the inner workings of UVM – Part 3

Monday, March 26th, 2018

In this blog, I am going to discuss different phases that UVM follows.

 

The reason why UVM came up with such phases is because synchronization among all design-testbench was necessary. Using Verilog and VHDL, verification engineers did not have facilities such as clocking block or run phases. Now, it is very important that the time at which test vectors applied from test-bench reaches the Design Under Test(DUT) at the same time. If timing for different signals varies then synchronicity lacks and thus verification can not be achieved as expected. That is the main reason why UVM has different phases.

 

The whole environment of UVM is structured on phases. They are active right from the beginning of the simulation to the end of the simulation. The topic discussed here will help people who are new to UVM. To start with, most of the phases are call back methods. The methods are either function or task. They are all derived from the UVM_Component class, same as other test-bench components. If you remember the first blog, we went through how to write a class. We understood the OOP concepts such as inheritance and even used them by extending the base class. Now, creating objects of the class is also important in order to use it as and when required. It is known as build_phase. This step takes place first. Next, after we write different classes, it is important to connect them. For example, if I write different classes with different functionality, at the end I provide them all under one top class. In Verilog it was top level module. In system Verilog it was class Environment. Under that main class, you connect all your semi classes which is known as connect_phase. Next, comes the end_of_elaboration_phase. By the time this phase becomes active, everything is connected and simulation next moment on wards is ready to begin.
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Understanding the inner workings of UVM – Part 2

Monday, January 29th, 2018

In this blog, my major focus is on explaining the concepts such as Sequence, Sequencer, Driver and showing how the communication takes place from sequence to sequencer and from sequencer to driver. In the previous blog, I included a top-level diagram of the UVM structure, showing different base classes. If you need refresh your memory on where the classes Sequence, Sequencer and Drivers stand please click https://www.aldec.com/en/company/blog/149–understanding-the-inner-workings-of-uvm.

So, let’s look at the main concepts and follow the communication mechanism they use for the effective execution of a test.
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The UVM Configuration Database

Tuesday, May 31st, 2016

blog_img_053116_01When I want to wear a certain clothing item, I take out it of the closet. When I go shopping, I add those clothes it to my closet and there are now new items for me to pick out in the future. A database works much the same way, a collection of information that is stored and accessed on demand.

 

Take the UVM configuration database for example. It basically acts as a repository so that when the time comes, certain portions of the UVM testbench can be obtained from the database and used to build the structure.

 

When items are placed in the database with a set() method (uvm_config_db::set()), components in lower levels will call the get() method in order to obtain the necessary parts to build the verification framework.

 

Sharing an interface

 

If I were to ‘set’ an interface from my top level into the database while simultaneously giving it an identifying name, officially referred to as the ‘field name’, I could later use the field name to retrieve that interface in my driver to connect to the DUT by calling the get() method (uvm_config_db::get()).

 

 

Fig. 1) Setting the interface in the configuration database using an identifier ‘my_identifier’

 

 

Fig. 2) In order to connect a monitor or driver to the dut, the get() function will need to be called to access the interface in the respective build phase.

 

Setting up configurations

 

dac 2016If I wanted to change or modify my testbench structure, I could create a ‘configuration’. In my configuration, I could specify some rules as to what components I want my testbench to have. If I am designing a processor where I’ve already loaded up the memory with instructions, there’s no need to generate stimulus, therefore I could eliminate the driver and sequencer.

 

This is what UVM refers to as passive and active modes. Passive mode is where only a monitor exists to observe data and active mode is where a driver and sequencer are needed to generate stimulus. Placing certain variables in the configuration database can help to determine whether the testbench is setup as passive or active.

 

In order to declare the testbench as passive or active, a configuration object is created. The built in uvm_active_passive_enum data type is used to indicate whether the testbench is UVM_ACTIVE or UVM_PASSIVE.

 

 

Fig. 3) An example configuration

 

For the rest of this article, visit the Aldec Design and Verification Blog.

UVM Register Layer: The Structure

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

UVM-Register-Layer-The-StructureI don’t know about you, but I am looking forward to the day where we won’t even have to go to the doctor’s office for an exam. Instead, we will all have scanners in our homes that will transmit full digital models to our doctors who can then poke, prod, and examine us remotely.

 

This is essentially what the UVM register layer allows and does. The UVM register layer acts similarly by modeling and abstracting registers of a design. It attempts to mirror the design registers by creating a model in the verification testbench. By applying stimulus to the register model, the actual design registers will exhibit the changes applied by the stimulus.

 

The benefit of this approach comes from the high level of abstraction provided. The bus protocols for accessing registers can change from design to design, but any stimulus developed for verification of the registers doesn’t have to. This makes it easy to port code from one project to the next if the registers are the same. Taking a look at Fig. 1 provides a better understanding of what a register model implementation might look like with respect to the UVM environment.
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Acceleration-Ready UVM Webinar with Doulos and Aldec

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

doulos_logo

Doulos CTO, John Aynsley, and I will be presenting a free 1 hour training  webinar, Acceleration-Ready UVM, on Wednesday April 13th, 2016. Learn more in this guest blog by John Aynsley, excerpted from the Aldec Design and Verification Blog.

Acceleration-Ready UVM 

by Doulos CTO, John Aynsley

We hear that emulation is one of the fastest-growing segments in EDA right now, yet simulation still continues to be the main workhorse for functional verification, and SystemVerilog and UVM are everywhere you look. But how do you combine the two? How do you run a UVM-based constrained random verification environment alongside an emulator and get reasonable execution speed?

 

Many vendors have solutions, including Aldec with their HES-DVM™ emulator. Their solution is based on the Accellera SCE-MI standard, and in particular on SV-Connect, which is a function-based interface that uses the SystemVerilog DPI (Direct Programming Interface) to pass information between the host and the emulator. You partition your UVM drivers and monitors into two parts, a small proxy that remains on the host and a synthesizable implementation that goes into the emulator. That way, all of the low-level timing detail is removed from the UVM code running on the host and is placed in the emulator, where it belongs. The communication between the host and the emulator can be optimized to avoid the emulator being stalled while waiting for the slower UVM simulation running on the host.

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UVM. It’s Organized and Systematic.

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016

The-fundamentals-of-UVMOne of the reasons I like using UVM is its tendency toward an organized structure and uniformity. Some may find it annoying to adhere to such a strict format in UVM, but I think it’s a good way to keep the basics of UVM engrained in your brain. You always want a good foundation and development of strong fundamentals in any endeavor. Verification is no different and UVM hammers the fundamentals home.

 

UVM has a great structure and organization paradigm. I consider there to be two distinct and fundamental elements in the UVM structure: Components and Objects. Now this characterization isn’t strictly correct because uvm_components are extended from uvm_objects, but I think they are used in such a way that warrants the distinction. I consider it similar to the idea of trucks and cars. In my view, trucks are also cars, but it’s useful to note the difference.

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Verifying Large FPGAs Isn’t Easy

Tuesday, December 15th, 2015

FPGA designers using VHDL have three choices: Stick with VHDL, switch to SystemVerilog, or.. use the best of both. This guest blog from Doug Perry, Senior Member Technical Staff at Doulos, outlines the pros and cons of each.

The latest crop of FPGA devices are enormous when compared to ASICs that were built not that long ago. Verifying these ASICs required detailed plans, multiple tools, and sometimes special languages. Verification was key because the cost of a respin was prohibitive.  FPGA designers using VHDL have three choices: Stick with VHDL, switch to SystemVerilog, or.. use the best of both. This guest blog from Doug Perry, Senior Member Technical Staff at Doulos, outlines the pros and cons of each.

The same is not necessarily true of FPGAs because they can simply be re-programmed when an error is found. However the cost of finding the error in the lab can still be very expensive. This is related to the fact that the number of LUTs available in the device has skyrocketed, but the number of IO pins has not. Therefore getting visibility into the inner workings of the device from outside becomes much more difficult. Finding the source of an error therefore also becomes increasingly difficult. To counteract this problem, designers need to find errors before the device gets into the lab. To do this they need to adopt ASIC-like verification methodologies.

U.V.M. Spells Relief

Friday, December 4th, 2015

blog_120215Verification can be a challenging endeavor. As designs grow in size and complexity, engineers are having difficulty confirming their designs behave properly. This is where UVM may provide some relief. UVM aims to deliver an easier and more flexible way of creating robust test environments so that you can verify those difficult designs effortlessly.

 

So what is UVM?

UVM stands for universal verification methodology and is based on an earlier verification methodology (OVM 2.1.1 developed by Cadence and Mentor Graphics). Accellera used this OVM base, continued development, and now maintains it as a more modern and updated version in UVM. Tangibly, UVM is a library of SystemVerilog code that is intended to help engineers write effective test and verification environments. You can download the UVM class library code, user guide, and reference documents from Accellera’s website.

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‘UVM Really is Everywhere’ at DVCon Europe

Wednesday, November 4th, 2015
Next week, Aldec will join other top tier organizations as a proud Silver Sponsor at DVCon Europe 2015 in Munich, Germany. There our team will offer live demonstrations of hardware-assisted verification of UVM following Doulos Ltd.’s Easier UVM guidelines. Alex Grove of Aldec will also deliver a DVCon Europe tutorial, ‘UVM Hardware Assisted Acceleration with FPGA Co-emulation’.

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‘Don’t Be Afraid of UVM’ Webinar on YouTube

Tuesday, October 27th, 2015

uvm_img_102715Just in time for Halloween, Aldec has released a popular past webinar Don’t be Afraid of UVM for Hardware Designers on YouTube.

Designers are usually very busy doing their work and have little time left for experimentation with new methodologies. Unfortunately for them, official documentation of UVM (Universal Verification Methodology) was written by Verification Engineers for Verification Engineers, concentrating on high-level features and completely neglecting lower-level details such as connecting UVM testbench to your design.

Our webinar starts with solid review of SystemVerilog interfaces with special attention paid to Virtual Interfaces. Then it proceeds to Sequences and other Data Items, processed by Sequencers and fed to the design under test via Drivers. The role of Monitors and Scoreboards in analysis of results is explained. The presentation concludes with environment configuration and running test from the top-level module.

For the rest of this article, visit the Aldec Design and Verification Blog.

TrueCircuits: IoTPLL
DAC2018



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