EDAToolsCafe
   >> Linux for Electronics Design Automation
Thread views: 260453 View all threadsNext thread*Threaded Mode

Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | 3 | (show all)
sanjaygangalAdministrator
(Stranger)
05/10/03 12:29 PM
EDA Vendors Support Linux Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Most of the EDA vendos now support most of their products on Linux now. This forum is open to both the EDA industry professionals as well as the CAD/ IC/ ASIC/ PCB/ System designers who are either using Linux or want to discuss use of Linux in the Electronics Design Process.

Here are some questions posed by Peggy Aycienna targeted towards EDA industry professional to get the discussions started. Users of the tools should jump in too with their take on this topic.

1) Have you ported none/some/all of our applications over to Linux. ? OR -- you are not there yet, but your future strategy with regards to Linux is ?.

2) You are developing your tools/products in one environment and then porting over to Linux and releasing everything at the same time ? OR ? there are timing differences between releases on one operating system and later releases of the same tool/version on Linux.

3) Your customers are telling us that they would/would not/must/might like to have Linux-based versions of your tools/applications ? the feedback you?re getting from your customers vis-a-vis Linux is tremendous/fascinating/annoying/burdensome/they could care less.

4) You are having to spend way too much/way too little/just the right amount of your precious resources chasing this Linux thing ? your customers find themselves in the same/different boat.

5) True or False ...Engineers love Linux ... IT Managers do not ... EDA is ambivalent.



Sanjay Gangal
V.P. Marketing
www.IBSystems.com

Edited by sanjaygangal on 06/09/03 10:05 AM.



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:37 PM
Response from Applied Wave Research new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Applied Wave Research (AWR) - ?Our EDA products are running natively on Windows today. We have ported our applications to run as a co-process on a Linux platform. We are presently performing a native Linux port to be completed later this year for those who only want to run Linux apps. We are developing our applications under Windows because of its advantages for software development. We will then port it to Linux, which is expected to be only a minor delay once the process is mature. We are getting requests to have our products running on Linux - it is Unix that people seem to be abandoning. The Linux porting effort seems to be very reasonable for us. What we see is that engineers just want to run their apps and really don't care about the operating system. It is the IT and CAD groups that are more interested in what OS is running.?




EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:39 PM
Reply from Joe Civello, Agilent new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply


Joe Civello, ADS Platform Product Manager for Agilent EEsof EDA - ?Agilent EEsof constantly monitors customer OS requirements. Within the last year or so, we've seen a much more organized approach by our customers to the transition to Linux than in prior years. Based on this recent change and Agilent EEsof's Alliance with Cadence, we plan to have Linux solutions for both the RF Design Environment and the Advanced Design System within the next 12 months. Our approach to PC/Unix/Linux OS support is fairly unique in the EDA industry - we don't port from one OS to another. Our products are architected with a layered application programming interface, which allows us the ability to deliver both at the same time, for each product release, without porting or duplicating effort. As such, we don't encounter the difficulties associated with porting from say PC to Unix or now Linux. Because of this architecture, the addition of Linux support, to the existing PC and Unix OSs supported today, is straightforward. In fact, internally, our R&D team has been using Linux for product development for several years. The benefits of Linux to the EDA customer is clear, reduced costs and enhanced performance. Agilent EEsof EDA's focus is on providing solutions that lower customers' total cost of ownership and increase productivity. ADS and RFDE support of Linux accomplish both.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:40 PM
Response from Eric Seabrook, Aldec new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Eric Seabrook, Product Marketing Manager at Aldec, Inc. - ?We have elected to port some of our products (based on demand) for use on Linux. Riviera is our cross-platform simulation solution without graphical entry currently available for Windows, Unix, and Linux. We offer graphical design entry for Windows only, but provide simulation on all platforms and also offer the migration of files generated in Windows to be verified on Linux for our customers that are utilizing server farms or remote resources. Our core technology is platform independent, which allows us to concentrate on the product and not the environment. Once completed and tested, it is then compiled to all platforms and available simultaneously to our customers.?

?We have not seen a tremendous request for a Linux version of our tool and get about 25% of the evaluation interest (based on download) for this operating system. We do however see Linux beginning to gain momentum for certain applications and anticipate future growth. We don't expend a great deal of time on Linux-related issues because of our development accomplishments and the ability to produce a Linux version simultaneously with other platforms. This allows us to support the Linux initiative with our tools and create better design methods without limitation. I don't see the Linux argument as a love/hate relationship, rather just another alternative for engineers and managers to use for certain applications. I also don't see Linux replacing engineering environments, but rather augmenting the development team's available resources. I believe from a cost stand-point that Linux offers great benefit to the IT manager comparable to other alternatives, but tool availability and flow requirements by designer are still not where they need to be.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:41 PM
Response from Robert DiGrazia, ASC new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Robert DiGrazia, Director of Marketing for Alternative System Concepts, Inc. - ?We have ported some of our applications to Linux, and expect to support future applications on Linux. We use multi-platform building mechanisms to cover all platforms. We build and release on all platforms simultaneously. Some of our customers prefer Linux. Most use Solaris or Windows. We spend just the right amount of time on Linux. Linux is largely compatible with other standard variants of Unix. It's true - engineers love Linux and EDA is ambivalent.?




EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:42 PM
Response from Axis Systems new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Axis Systems, Inc. - ?Axis Systems recently announced its support of Linux, creating the first, complete Linux-based hardware acceleration and emulation systems. All of Axis' simulation, acceleration, and emulation products, based on our ReConfigurable Computing technology and software, have been ported to Linux. The development of Axis' products is nearly independent of the OS, whether it is Linux or Solaris. Both Axis and its customers feel that the time invested in Linux development has been worthwhile. Axis' decision to support a Linux-based verification workflow was based on a strong customer trend to supplement Solaris development with Linux. Initial feedback from customers indicates that the availability of a Linux-centered design methodology is providing them with cost-effective performance gains. Axis' expansion into Linux fits into its Design Team Emulation solution, which not only provides emulation for verification teams, but also expands the usage of emulation to system, hardware, and software engineering in a development environment - whether Solaris or Linux. EDA stays close to its customers' needs and supports whatever will make them most successful.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:43 PM
Response from Mitch Weaver @ Cadence new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Mitch Weaver, Vice President of the Marketing, Functional Verification group, Cadence Design Systems, Inc. - ?Cadence enthusiastically supports Linux. Engineers tell us they like the combination of price/performance and mobility that it provides. We're finding strong demand for both the Cadence Incisive verification platform and the Encounter Digital IC design platform on Linux.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:44 PM
Response from Jeff Jussel @ Celoxica new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Jeff Jussel, Vice President of Marketing for Celoxica - ?Celoxica's tools for Software-Compiled System Design primarily target field programmable SoC devices and hence run on Windows to better integrate with existing FPGA vendor tools. Some of our customers have expressed interest in Linux versions of our products. The focus of this interest varies across organizations, in some there is a corporate IT move towards Linux, in others the corporate preference is Windows with some engineers using Linux workstations. Overall we have not found that our current Windows-only approach has become a purchase-critical issue - even in 'officially' Unix-only organizations, there seems to be a Windows PC available. Our current product set is developed and supported on Windows platforms, but we acknowledge in our product strategy that there is a growing interest in Linux. Our product code is readily portable to Linux and we are currently working on a commercial port to Linux, which we expect to have available as an early release version later this calendar year, with full commercial availability during 2004.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:45 PM
Response from Pete Hardee @ CoWare new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Pete Hardee, Director of Product Marketing for CoWare, Inc. - ?As a result of customer demand, all CoWare's tools are ported to Linux, and have been for the at least the last three releases. Our new ConvergenSC product family was our first release completely developed on Linux, then ported to Solaris. Customers investing in new hardware are buying Linux boxes. Customers love running three or four times faster on boxes that cost a fraction of the price of Unix workstations. Two or three years ago, there may have been some doubt. However, customers have been demanding Linux for years and have been getting it from most vendors for some time. If there are any managers who haven't woken up to Linux, just call them Rip Van Winkle! You can get Linux boxes for hundreds of dollars, running Pentiums at 2.5GHz. Even IT managers have got to love that. One important development overlooked by these questions, however, is the impact of Linux on embedded software. Embedded Linux as a real-time operating system is gaining favor and changing the game in the RTOS market. We'll be booting Linux live at DAC on a SystemC transactional prototype.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:46 PM
Response from Lauro Rizzati @ EVE new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Lauro Rizzatti, Vice President of Marketing at Emulation and Verification Engineering (EVE) - ?EVE's software runs under Linux, and we may or may not port it to other platforms. Our software development environment is based on Linux and we will continue to design our future products under Linux. Our customers overwhelmingly like Linux. We have not lost any potential business because of Linux. Customers either use Linux today, or plan to adopt Linux soon. Engineers love Linux. Some IT Managers do, others do not. All EDA vendors either support Linux today or will support Linux in the near future.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:47 PM
Response from Alec Stanculescu @ Fintronic new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Alec Stanculescu, President and CEO of Fintronic USA, Inc. - ?Fintronic was the first company to deliver a commercial Verilog simulator on Linux in 1993. Our development platform has been Linux since 1992. EETimes wrote an article in November 1999 presenting Fintronic as the leading Linux supporter in the EDA industry. Fintronic provides its most advanced features on Linux and on Sun. Our customers love the quality, performance, open architecture, support, and price of the Linux platform. Over the years, Linux has become more and more manageable, reaching a state today where it is as manageable as any Unix environment, but at a much lower cost. The help from ASL Inc., which provides our pre-installed Linux workstations, makes it a pleasure to maintain all the Linux machines in working order. The icon-based user interface, provided by Red Hat, makes Linux easier to use than in the past. The high quality, free compilers from GNU together with the increasingly high performance of the Pentium-like platforms make Linux on PCs ideal for both software developers and hardware designers.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:48 PM
Response from Brett Cline @ Forte Design Systems new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Brett Cline, Vice President of Marketing for Forte Design Systems - ?All of the Forte products are supported on the Linux platform and are released on other platforms at the same time. We use Linux throughout the company as both a development and regression testing platform. The use and support of the Linux platform has two major benefits for us: 1) Some of our customers require it, and 2) as a development platform, it provides VASTLY superior performance-per-dollar to proprietary Unix systems. While some people may consider the support of Linux a burden, we consider it a benefit, since we now have the kind of compute farms and servers that we could not afford 5 years ago. We have heard the same thing from customers, some of whom have significant simulation-farms of Linux machines. The management of the Linux machines is, in our experience, no more difficult than the management of proprietary Unix solutions. Our engineers love them and our IT folks see no discernable difference (except that we now have a lot more of them).?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:49 PM
Response from Jackson Kreiter, CEO, Hier Design new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Jackson Kreiter, CEO at Hier Design Inc. - ?We got our funding in a bleak time. It was during 9/11. So we wanted to stretch our budget as far as possible. At some point our little $20K Sun just couldn't keep up. My choice was a) buy another Sun, b) buy a much cheaper Linux box and port our software, or c) do nothing. Well you can't make any progress doing nothing, and we just didn't have money to buy another Sun, so Linux was the choice for us. And, on top of that, we got a 4x run-time improvement.?




EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:50 PM
Response from David Knol @ Hier Design new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

David Knol, Engineering Manager for Infrastructure at Hier Design Inc. - ?The majority of the Hier Design engineering staff - both R&D and AEs - use Linux as the primary platform for code development, as well as running live customer designs. A PC running Linux offers two huge benefits over a comparable Sun running Solaris - better than 4x the performance for less than 1/4 the cost. It boosts engineering productivity and keeps the CFO happy. Linux is preferred to Windows because it offers the security and stability that only a Unix environment can provide. We aim to release software on all our supported platforms at the same time. Most customers are already running on Linux. Most who aren't seem to be thinking they'll make the transition soon. The cost/performance factor that benefits us, also benefits our customers. 'Chasing this Linux thing' is an inaccurate description of our situation. It's been a 'no-brainer' for us from the start. Linux won't likely obliterate Windows anytime soon, although the Linux/x86 platform does appear to be a real threat to Sun. Often times, engineers do love Linux. You'll find all kinds of IT managers. But from an EDA standpoint, the cost/productivity advantage of Linux is compelling to any company, especially in these hard economic times.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:51 PM
Response from Rob Burns @ Intime Software new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Ron Burns, Vice President of Sales and Marketing at InTime Software, Inc. - ?We've ported all of our applications to Linux. We deliver simultaneously on Solaris and Linux. Our customers like our tools on Linux - we have had tremendous response regarding our tools on Linux. InTime's combination of RTL timing analysis and the Linux platform has given our customers an advantage in getting their products to market. We are spending the right amount of time on Linux and our customers are also spending the right amount of time. We are believers in Linux and do not think EDA is ambivalent. We really believe in speed, and Linux platforms are delivering speed.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:52 PM
Response from Magma Design Automation new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Magma Design Automation, Inc. - ?All Magma products (since we have a single executable) have been ported to Linux. All of our products are 'co-developed' on Linux and released at the same time as the other platforms. Our customers tell us they must have Linux-based versions of our tool and the feedback vis-a-vis Linux is tremendous. We have spent the right amount of resources on Linux. It's true that engineers love Linux, but false that IT managers do not, or that EDA is ambivalent towards Linux.?




EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:52 PM
Response from Mentor Graphics new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Mentor Graphics Corp. - ?Mentor Graphics has ported a significant number of products to the Linux operating system and will continue to respond to customers who believe that Linux is an optimal EDA environment choice. However, as with product releases on other platforms, Linux releases may not always coincide with product releases on other platforms. Some Mentor Graphics customers request Linux-based versions of EDA applications and tools because Linux allows a choice of lower-cost and higher-performance hardware. However, they find it confusing to identify software tools and hardware products that match the available Linux distributions. Mentor Graphics is investing in Linux to meet these customer requirements. EDA has an insatiable appetite for computing performance, capacity, and technology. As Linux emerges in EDA, and other technical computing environments, IT managers must support the disruptive characteristics of an additional operating system.?




EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:53 PM
Response from Cedric Iwashina, Monterey Design new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Cedric Iwashina, Director of Corporate Marketing at Monterey Design Systems - ?We have ported all of our applications over to Linux, and many of our customers insist on Linux. We release our products on our two primary platforms at the same time - Solaris and Linux. Linux is a 'must' - the economic and performance considerations are too compelling to be ignored. EDA has always suffered the burden of having to support multiple hardware/software platforms; it is simply part of the cost of doing business. Our customers understandably seek out the most cost-effective platform solutions, but any savings on hardware are offset by the hidden cost to the customer of supporting application software on multiple platforms. It's true, engineers love the performance, while IT managers' jobs are complicated by the lower reliability of the Linux platforms and by having to support multiple platforms on heterogeneous networks. EDA, however, is accustomed to supporting multiple platforms.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:54 PM
Response from Graham Bell, Nassda Corp. new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Graham Bell, Director of Marketing at Nassda Corp. - ?All of our verification and analysis products run on Linux. These are ideal applications for Linux since designers are always looking for faster results and can take advantage of low-cost hardware that runs at clock speeds up to 3 GHz. Linux is not a poor stepchild in our development process. We run regressions every night on our Linux versions. Linux adoption is continuing, and we find that customers are accelerating their interest now that Cadence supports both their analog and mixed-signal design environments on Linux. Resources are not a problem in supporting Linux. One question we do have is, 'How quickly will engineers be moving to 64-bit Linux, and how popular will the Intel and AMD architectures be?' Yes, engineers love Linux because it feels like Unix, runs 2x-3x faster, and is a viable alternative to Bill Gates' Windows. IT people want to support fewer platforms, not more. EDA is looking for anything that will sell more licenses, and if that means customers' Linux support, then it will be broadly adopted.?



EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:57 PM
Response from Mark Williams, CEO, Pulsic new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Mark Williams, CEO at Pulsic - ?Pulsic has ported all its applications over to the Linux platform. The company develops its products within a single development environment that builds on all platforms simultaneously. So every release of every product is available on all platforms at the same time. Many of our customers have said they would like our products to support Linux, due to the great value-for-money it delivers, in terms of power versus cost. In general, the feedback from our customers indicates that currently the market is impressed with Linux, but we firmly believe (a belief we know is shared with many of our customers) that once a 64-bit PC-based system is available, the Linux solution will become tremendously compelling. Pulsic has had to spend little time on adding the Linux platform to its platform portfolio. However, our customers have found that the transition to Linux is not quite as straightforward, for various reasons - for example, some other EDA tools do not support Linux, or they work less efficiently under Linux. Another issue - Linux is perceived by some groups as not as stable as the other more established hardware vendors, such as Sun and HP. It's true that engineers love Linux, while IT managers are ambivalent. EDA is seemingly ambivalent, but ultimately companies simply must aim to include Linux within their product strategy, or they will get left behind in the wake of those that already do.?




EDACafeEditor
(Stranger )
05/23/03 01:59 PM
Response from Rajiv Kumar, COO, Real Intent new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Rajiv Kumar, COO, Vice President and Co-Founder of Real Intent Corp. - ?We support our products on Linux. We release everything at the same time on all Unix platforms - Linux, Solaris and HP-UX. Our Linux solutions are in demand due to the high-performance and low-cost solutions of Linux platforms. We spend just the right amount of time on Linux, since we recognized Linux demand from day one and have proactively built support for it. Engineers love Linux due to high performance at low cost, and EDA has embraced the idea that it needs to do it. But there are some business problems with Linux - lack of support, a very fast release train, lack of guaranteed forward binary compatibility. These will delay the adoption. The EDA industry and the Linux providers need to address these problems together.?



EDACafeEditor
(Newbie)
05/23/03 02:00 PM
Response from Bob Dahlberg, ReShape new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Bob Dahlberg, Vice President of Development at ReShape, Inc. - ?Linux is our preferred platform - everything we do is Linux first. A Sun [platform] is needed in a physical design shop because they support 64-bit. You need 64-bit to support large chips in doing physical design verification like extraction and DRC. We are developing our tools/products in one environment and then porting over to Linux and releasing everything at the same time. We develop in Linux first, and port to Sun second. Meanwhile, we have not talked to a single customer that does not believe that Linux in their shop is inevitable. The price/performance is too compelling - 2x to 3x the speed at one-half to one-third the cost. Larger corporations have legacy with Suns and HPs to deal with, but even they are making way [for Linux]. As a new company, ReShape can support the new trend in hardware more easily than an established EDA house. Today is not unlike the time when Synopsys/Cadence were getting started in the late 1980's, and when Sun and X Windows were overtaking Apollo and DEC VAX as the preferred EDA standard platform. Synopsys never had to support Apollo/DEC as those standards faded. With apologies to Vince Lombardi, 'Linux is the thing. The only thing.' The price/performance advantage is just too compelling.?

?It's true that engineers love Linux, but for now, IT managers do not. They don't like anything new as a rule, but they're being hammered to reduce costs. EDA companies are not ambivalent. EDA companies in their youth have always loved the fastest box. In its earliest days, Mentor pushed the Apollo DN660. Valid was the first to push the Sun3, which at the time was the first 1MIP workstation. Now that fine tradition lives on with the Linux wave. ReShape loves it. Synopsys' VCS group hopped on to Linux at least two years ago. (VCS R&D knows that speed sells.) Magma is touting it. It's only the out-of-touch EDA companies that support last generation's fastest box, who remain ambivalent about Linux.?



EDACafeEditor
(Newbie)
05/23/03 02:01 PM
Response from Mitch Mastellone, CTO- Synchronicity new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Mitch Mastellone, CTO for Synchronicity, Inc. - ?Synchronicity has two main product lines, the Developer Suite for design collaboration and management and the Publisher Suite for design reuse, IP distribution, and support. We started shipping the Developer Suite on Linux last year and the larger, server-oriented Publisher Suite will be available on Linux before the end of 2003. Once we announce support for a particular OS like Red Hat Linux 7.3, new releases arrive simultaneously with versions for other OSs. We have a mixed OS development environment. Though it's mostly Solaris, we also use HP-UX, AIX, Windows, and Linux machines, so we can build and test every night on all the platforms we support. We have 120+ customers and they range from Linux activists to being totally indifferent. With its strong potential performance/price ratio on 32-bit machines, many of our customers are adopting Linux and we have responded to this significant customer demand by supporting the common variants of Linux.?

?Since we primarily develop our software on other flavors of Unix, supporting Linux is not difficult, but the number of configurations adds to our quality test burden. The flipside is, the standardization of Unix-related platforms (e.g., a common underlying kernel) should help us reduce that complexity going forward. Both the complications and potential solutions apply to our customers as well. Again, there is a range of love for Linux in the marketplace. Some engineers love it because they have more control, which might makes some IT people nervous. At other companies, the IT department is trying to force Linux roll-outs as a cost-saving measure, but the engineers really love their proven Solaris or HP-UX. The various support models evolving in the marketplace will also affect Linux adoption.?



EDACafeEditor
(Newbie)
05/23/03 02:02 PM
Response from Synopsys new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Synopsys Inc. - ?Synopsys has ported all our products to Linux. We were an early adopter and announced our first major products on Linux in 2000. Our product line is extensive, while developing and porting across environments varies internally. When our products are released on a primary platform such as Linux, all products are released at the same time. We've been selling Linux-based versions of our tools for a couple of years. Our customers are indicating their support for Linux by way of their purchases. We're spending the right amount of time to give our customers Linux-based products. With regards to the true/false questions - Linux has too many aspects to be categorized in this simple fashion.?



EDACafeEditor
(Newbie)
05/23/03 02:02 PM
Response from Jeff Garrison, Synplicity new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Jeff Garrison, Director of Product Marketing at Synplicity Inc. - ?We have ported most of our applications to Linux already, and expect nearly all, if not all, of our applications will eventually be ported to Linux. We are developing our applications on multiple platforms, but mostly on WindowsNT/2000. We port our applications over to Linux, Solaris, and HP-UX - and we generally release all platforms at the same time. We are clearly seeing more customers interested in the Linux platform over time. There is a small segment of users that are passionate about Linux and consider it a must, but for most it is a 'nice to have' capability. Regarding feedback from our customers on Linux - they are glad we have it, but we don't really see this feedback as being much different than that of other platforms as our applications run well on Linux.?

?We are probably spending about the right amount of resources on Linux. There does seem to be more releases per year of Linux - like Red Hat, for example - which causes additional testing of resources. Also there are many different variations of Linux (Red Hat, SuSe, Debian, Gnome, etc.), so we can't fully test all of them, but that has not been a problem to date. One irregularity with Linux is that, due to its open-source nature, licensing security is weak. While our applications run on Linux, we do require an NT/2000 or other Unix machine in the network to host the license server. Meanwhile, basically it's true - engineers love Linux, IT managers do not, and EDA is ambivalent.?



EDACafeEditor
(Newbie)
05/23/03 02:03 PM
Response from Paul McLellan, Vast Systems new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Paul McLellan, Vice President of Marketing and Business Development at VaST Systems Technology Corp. - ?VaST sells tools into three main spaces: SoC architects, chip designers doing co-verification, and embedded software developers. Architects and chip designers run primarily on Unix of one flavor or another, including Linux. Software developers run almost exclusively on Windows. The main challenge to running on Linux is that the GUI for our tools was written using Microsoft Foundation. But Linux users expect an X-windows flavor user-interface, so extensive changes are necessary. However, Linux has another role to play in our space since it is an operating system that can run on the virtual platform. VaST can boot a simulated microprocessor running Linux in about 10 seconds. Real-time Linux is starting to make inroads as an embedded operating system for cell phones and other systems. In the embedded market, its competition is not PC-windows but rather Symbian and WinCE.?



EDACafeEditor
(Newbie)
05/23/03 02:04 PM
Response from David Crites, Zenasis new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

David Crites, Director of Sales for Zenasis Technologies, Inc. - ?We are developing ZenTime on Sun and then porting to Linux. ZenTime on Sun is available now. We have a preliminary port on Linux and will be releasing it to customers next quarter. After our first Linux release, we expect the delay between our Sun and Linux releases to decrease substantially. Many customers are requesting a Linux version, some require it. Since getting our first product out is most important, we have spent just enough time on Linux to understand the challenges and benefits of a Linux release. I'd say engineers seem to love Linux; IT guys seem to love what they know best; and EDA vendors, like us, love the price/performance potential of Linux, but appreciate the beaten path available on Sun.?



jessicaamirr
(Stranger )
11/26/15 04:29 AM
Re: Response from Lauro Rizzati @ EVE new [re: EDACafeEditor]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

The article affirms a couple of wrong thigs. First, Ubuntu has never been a rolling distribution. Second, LTS releases have always had point updates, that have nothing to do with MS service packs. They are just disc respins wit all the patches collected together, that avoid downloading all the updates for new installers.


The Inquirer... strikes again. Dot net Courses in Chennai |Sas Training Institute in Chennai  | Linux Courses in Chennai


 


 


 






Pages in this thread: 1 | 2 | 3 | (show all)
View all threadsNext thread*Threaded Mode
Jump to

 

CST Webinar Series



Internet Business Systems © 2016 Internet Business Systems, Inc.
595 Millich Dr., Suite 216, Campbell, CA 95008
+1 (408)-337-6870 — Contact Us, or visit our other sites:
AECCafe - Architectural Design and Engineering TechJobsCafe - Technical Jobs and Resumes GISCafe - Geographical Information Services  MCADCafe - Mechanical Design and Engineering ShareCG - Share Computer Graphic (CG) Animation, 3D Art and 3D Models
  Privacy Policy