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EDACafeEditor
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05/23/03 01:59 PM
Response from Rajiv Kumar, COO, Real Intent new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Rajiv Kumar, COO, Vice President and Co-Founder of Real Intent Corp. - ?We support our products on Linux. We release everything at the same time on all Unix platforms - Linux, Solaris and HP-UX. Our Linux solutions are in demand due to the high-performance and low-cost solutions of Linux platforms. We spend just the right amount of time on Linux, since we recognized Linux demand from day one and have proactively built support for it. Engineers love Linux due to high performance at low cost, and EDA has embraced the idea that it needs to do it. But there are some business problems with Linux - lack of support, a very fast release train, lack of guaranteed forward binary compatibility. These will delay the adoption. The EDA industry and the Linux providers need to address these problems together.?



EDACafeEditor
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05/23/03 02:00 PM
Response from Bob Dahlberg, ReShape new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Bob Dahlberg, Vice President of Development at ReShape, Inc. - ?Linux is our preferred platform - everything we do is Linux first. A Sun [platform] is needed in a physical design shop because they support 64-bit. You need 64-bit to support large chips in doing physical design verification like extraction and DRC. We are developing our tools/products in one environment and then porting over to Linux and releasing everything at the same time. We develop in Linux first, and port to Sun second. Meanwhile, we have not talked to a single customer that does not believe that Linux in their shop is inevitable. The price/performance is too compelling - 2x to 3x the speed at one-half to one-third the cost. Larger corporations have legacy with Suns and HPs to deal with, but even they are making way [for Linux]. As a new company, ReShape can support the new trend in hardware more easily than an established EDA house. Today is not unlike the time when Synopsys/Cadence were getting started in the late 1980's, and when Sun and X Windows were overtaking Apollo and DEC VAX as the preferred EDA standard platform. Synopsys never had to support Apollo/DEC as those standards faded. With apologies to Vince Lombardi, 'Linux is the thing. The only thing.' The price/performance advantage is just too compelling.?

?It's true that engineers love Linux, but for now, IT managers do not. They don't like anything new as a rule, but they're being hammered to reduce costs. EDA companies are not ambivalent. EDA companies in their youth have always loved the fastest box. In its earliest days, Mentor pushed the Apollo DN660. Valid was the first to push the Sun3, which at the time was the first 1MIP workstation. Now that fine tradition lives on with the Linux wave. ReShape loves it. Synopsys' VCS group hopped on to Linux at least two years ago. (VCS R&D knows that speed sells.) Magma is touting it. It's only the out-of-touch EDA companies that support last generation's fastest box, who remain ambivalent about Linux.?



EDACafeEditor
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05/23/03 02:01 PM
Response from Mitch Mastellone, CTO- Synchronicity new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Mitch Mastellone, CTO for Synchronicity, Inc. - ?Synchronicity has two main product lines, the Developer Suite for design collaboration and management and the Publisher Suite for design reuse, IP distribution, and support. We started shipping the Developer Suite on Linux last year and the larger, server-oriented Publisher Suite will be available on Linux before the end of 2003. Once we announce support for a particular OS like Red Hat Linux 7.3, new releases arrive simultaneously with versions for other OSs. We have a mixed OS development environment. Though it's mostly Solaris, we also use HP-UX, AIX, Windows, and Linux machines, so we can build and test every night on all the platforms we support. We have 120+ customers and they range from Linux activists to being totally indifferent. With its strong potential performance/price ratio on 32-bit machines, many of our customers are adopting Linux and we have responded to this significant customer demand by supporting the common variants of Linux.?

?Since we primarily develop our software on other flavors of Unix, supporting Linux is not difficult, but the number of configurations adds to our quality test burden. The flipside is, the standardization of Unix-related platforms (e.g., a common underlying kernel) should help us reduce that complexity going forward. Both the complications and potential solutions apply to our customers as well. Again, there is a range of love for Linux in the marketplace. Some engineers love it because they have more control, which might makes some IT people nervous. At other companies, the IT department is trying to force Linux roll-outs as a cost-saving measure, but the engineers really love their proven Solaris or HP-UX. The various support models evolving in the marketplace will also affect Linux adoption.?



EDACafeEditor
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05/23/03 02:02 PM
Response from Synopsys new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Synopsys Inc. - ?Synopsys has ported all our products to Linux. We were an early adopter and announced our first major products on Linux in 2000. Our product line is extensive, while developing and porting across environments varies internally. When our products are released on a primary platform such as Linux, all products are released at the same time. We've been selling Linux-based versions of our tools for a couple of years. Our customers are indicating their support for Linux by way of their purchases. We're spending the right amount of time to give our customers Linux-based products. With regards to the true/false questions - Linux has too many aspects to be categorized in this simple fashion.?



EDACafeEditor
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05/23/03 02:02 PM
Response from Jeff Garrison, Synplicity new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Jeff Garrison, Director of Product Marketing at Synplicity Inc. - ?We have ported most of our applications to Linux already, and expect nearly all, if not all, of our applications will eventually be ported to Linux. We are developing our applications on multiple platforms, but mostly on WindowsNT/2000. We port our applications over to Linux, Solaris, and HP-UX - and we generally release all platforms at the same time. We are clearly seeing more customers interested in the Linux platform over time. There is a small segment of users that are passionate about Linux and consider it a must, but for most it is a 'nice to have' capability. Regarding feedback from our customers on Linux - they are glad we have it, but we don't really see this feedback as being much different than that of other platforms as our applications run well on Linux.?

?We are probably spending about the right amount of resources on Linux. There does seem to be more releases per year of Linux - like Red Hat, for example - which causes additional testing of resources. Also there are many different variations of Linux (Red Hat, SuSe, Debian, Gnome, etc.), so we can't fully test all of them, but that has not been a problem to date. One irregularity with Linux is that, due to its open-source nature, licensing security is weak. While our applications run on Linux, we do require an NT/2000 or other Unix machine in the network to host the license server. Meanwhile, basically it's true - engineers love Linux, IT managers do not, and EDA is ambivalent.?



EDACafeEditor
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05/23/03 02:03 PM
Response from Paul McLellan, Vast Systems new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

Paul McLellan, Vice President of Marketing and Business Development at VaST Systems Technology Corp. - ?VaST sells tools into three main spaces: SoC architects, chip designers doing co-verification, and embedded software developers. Architects and chip designers run primarily on Unix of one flavor or another, including Linux. Software developers run almost exclusively on Windows. The main challenge to running on Linux is that the GUI for our tools was written using Microsoft Foundation. But Linux users expect an X-windows flavor user-interface, so extensive changes are necessary. However, Linux has another role to play in our space since it is an operating system that can run on the virtual platform. VaST can boot a simulated microprocessor running Linux in about 10 seconds. Real-time Linux is starting to make inroads as an embedded operating system for cell phones and other systems. In the embedded market, its competition is not PC-windows but rather Symbian and WinCE.?



EDACafeEditor
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05/23/03 02:04 PM
Response from David Crites, Zenasis new [re: sanjaygangal]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

David Crites, Director of Sales for Zenasis Technologies, Inc. - ?We are developing ZenTime on Sun and then porting to Linux. ZenTime on Sun is available now. We have a preliminary port on Linux and will be releasing it to customers next quarter. After our first Linux release, we expect the delay between our Sun and Linux releases to decrease substantially. Many customers are requesting a Linux version, some require it. Since getting our first product out is most important, we have spent just enough time on Linux to understand the challenges and benefits of a Linux release. I'd say engineers seem to love Linux; IT guys seem to love what they know best; and EDA vendors, like us, love the price/performance potential of Linux, but appreciate the beaten path available on Sun.?



jessicaamirr
(Stranger )
11/26/15 04:29 AM
Re: Response from Lauro Rizzati @ EVE new [re: EDACafeEditor]Report this article as Inappropriate to us !!!Login to Reply

The article affirms a couple of wrong thigs. First, Ubuntu has never been a rolling distribution. Second, LTS releases have always had point updates, that have nothing to do with MS service packs. They are just disc respins wit all the patches collected together, that avoid downloading all the updates for new installers.


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