EDACafe Weekly Review June 28th, 2012

Pop Pop iPop :: Prince King Potentate
June 28, 2012  by Peggy Aycinena

 

The week of Fourth of July in the U.S. is a short work week and one where most people are on vacation, or at least thinking about it. So let’s take a break from the day-to-day stress of work and worry, and think about other things as well – things like innovation.

The following was first published in October 2011 in EDA Confidential, just a few days after Steve Jobs passed away.

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Pop Pop iPop …

Over the last 60 years, three wildly different anarchists have grabbed the Common Man by the throat, forced him to take off the blinders, stop signing on the bottom line, and cease obsessing about crossing those damn t’s or dotting those accursed i’s. In so doing, these three more than any others of their time redefined the modern zeitgeist and created 20th Century Man, a hominid unrecognizable from any that came before.

And, because the risks of fomenting chaos often – and perversely – generate great rewards, these guys also raked in an outsized share of the cosmic pie and were anointed, respectively, Prince of Pop, King of Pop, and Potentate of iPop.

It wasn’t all goodness and light, however; the Fates insisted on having the last word in the unscripted and tumultuous glories of the three. Clearly flying too close to the sun, not a single one of them lived to see a 60th birthday.

Before I step on stage for a performance, I look at the crowd and say, “Lord, please don’t let me screw this up.” But it is the effort before this performance that really leads to this moment. First we have a casting process, where we try to find the best actor to play the lead, then the understudy, then the extras and technical team etc. This is usually done by a director, someone who has excelled at acting before, and develops the entire vision. Then we memorize our lines, this is the most mind-numbing and difficult part, so to prevent mental break downs, we divide the script up into smaller parts. We start with a few simple lines, then progressively add more lines and difficulty of memorization. Then we block the entire play, see what goes where, and perform it. Next, we have dress rehearsals, we get comfortable performing in our costumes and make sure things go off without a hitch. Now after all of this, we present it to the audience and hope that we don’t get pelted with tomatoes. After we perform, we wait for the audience to react, if they respond with cheers, we repeat the act the same way the next night with minor adjustments, if we are hurt and killed with articles of food, we then see what to improve and make changes for the next show.

D68000 IP Core with Linux, MAC & debugger
June 28, 2012  by Sanjay Gangal

Article source: Digital Core Design

Digital Core Design, IP Core and SoC design laboratories from Poland have introduced the newest version of the Motorola’s 68000 16/32-bit microprocessor. D68000 is the industry’s low cost 32-bit MCU, offering not only a low cost entry point but also effective performance. Improved architecture enables this IP Core to run with uCLinux, so it can be  easily used as HTTP server or FTP client.

The D68000 is 100% compatible with original Motorola’s 68000 and as a proof, just to mention, that a test run on classic Amiga 500+ computer showed clearly that DCD’s CPU can be 1:1 replacement for original chip. But classic computers are not the target destination for the product, cause improved architecture, creates new possibilities. D68000 runs with uCLinux Operating System, which makes this IP Core interesting solution for embedded servers, certified to be used only with m68k processors. The BOA application is used as HTTP server and effective communication could be established through FTP protocol. uCLinux is a MMU‐less derivative of Linux Operating System adopted for embedded solutions. It provides all of the Linux benefits including superior stability, Common Linux Kernel API, multitasking, full featured TCP/IP networking, Virtual File System and reduces the amount of memory needed by its kernel and running applications [it utilizes just 400kB].

 


Over the last few weeks
, quite a lot of things have happened here in the Bay Area: some expected, some unexpected, some uncanny, and some downright Uncanny Valley.

For instance, it was expected that the Bay-to-Breakers would run early on May 20th, but unexpected that the weather would be so lovely on that morning. It was expected that a solar eclipse would happen just before sundown on the same day, but unexpected that the weather would hold out so millions in the Bay Area could see it. In other words, no fog in the morning or the afternoon.

It was expected on May 27th that the 75th anniversary of the opening of the Golden Gate Bridge would be celebrated with extraordinary fireworks, but unexpected that the fog hovering off the coast should wait until just after the fireworks display to finally enter in through the Golden Gate.

A few months ago at 2012 San Jose SNUG, I attended the FinFET keynote speech by Professor Chenming Hu, the Father of FinFET. Professor Hu’s speech was exceptionally well received by the audience (more than 400 people). I had the opportunity to meet him . Because his keynote was really informative and because FinFET technology is an innovative and captivating subject, I asked Professor Hu to share more of his insights and vision on the FinFET technology with us.

Dr. Chenming Hu has been called the Father of 3D Transistors for leading FinFET development in 1999.   Intel is the first company to use FinFET in 2011 production calling it the most radical shift in semiconductor technology in over 50 years.  Other companies are expected to follow.  IEEE called him “Microelectronics Visionary” and noted his pioneering contributions to integrated circuit reliability in presenting him the Nishizawa Medal for “achievements critical to producing smaller yet more reliable and higher-performance integrated circuits”.   US Semiconductor Industry Association thanked him for research leadership for “advancement of the electronics industry and of our national economy”.  IEEE EDS gave him the 2011 Education Award for “distinguished contributions to education and inspiration of students, practicing engineers and future educators”.

He has authored four books including a new textbook and 900 research papers, and has been granted over 100 US patents.  He is a fellow of the IEEE and an Honorary Professor of CAS Microelectronics Institute and National Chiao Tung University.   His many awards include the 2007 Andrew Grove Award for device reliability research and the 2002 Donald Pederson Award in Solid State Circuits for the BSIM standard transistor model.  The 2009 SRC Aristotle Award recognized him as an influential mentor to many outstanding students.  He has received UC Berkeley’s highest honor for teaching — the Berkeley Distinguished Teaching Award. He is researching green tunnel transistor for ultra-low-power electronics.

The EDA and MCAD/MCAE Almanac – Nominal Q1 2012
June 24, 2012  by Dr. Russ Henke


Dear faithful blog reader:
Please take a few minutes of your valuable time to read the June 25, 2012 article, “The EDA and MCAD/MCAE Almanac – Nominal Q1 2012.”

You may reach the new June 25 EDA and MCAD/MCAE Commentary via two different paths:

(1)      Returning to the front page of EDACafe.com, and scrolling down the left-hand column, finding a box with a URL posted with a photo of yours truly, and clicking on the title in the box:

or:

(2)      By clicking here right now on the URL below to go directly to the article:

http://www10.edacafe.com/nbc/articles/view_article.php?articleid=1099325

Enjoy!

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