EDACafe Weekly Review July 26th, 2012

A lint tool is a design and coding guideline checker for HDL code and confirms that  it is ‘clean’ and ready for the design tool chain.  The rules used in a lint tool capture years of experience and typically come from industry standards such as the Reuse Methodology Manual (RMM), and the IP reuse guidelines from STARC.

Besides helping to enforce some appropriate naming schemes, they evaluate design and coding deficiencies that impact simulation, synthesis, test, performance and RTL/gate-level sign-off.  Some of the common RTL lint rules include:

  • Unsynthesizable constructs
  • Unintentional latches
  • Unused declarations
  • Multiply driven and undriven signals
  • Race conditions
  • Incorrect usage of blocking and non-blocking assignments
  • Incomplete assignments in subroutines
  • Case statement style issues
  • Set and reset conflicts
  • Out of range indexing

Jim Hogan: Surf & Turf in Santa Cruz
July 26, 2012  by Peggy Aycinena


There are three things to remember about Jim Hogan: He’s an affable guy, he’s usually sporting a Hawaiian shirt, and he’s extremely accessible; when you interview him, he’s able to talk to you without a PR person sitting at his elbow. I spoke with Jim by phone in late July.


WWJD: How are you doing, and what’s up with this upcoming surfing-themed fundraiser you’re hosting?

Jim Hogan: I’d doing great, and yeah – that’s an annual fund raiser we host. I live in Santa Cruz, where life is pretty easy and my kids surf.

Also I work a lot with Jill Jacobs [Mod Marketing], who’s got relatives here in Santa Cruz. Jill was my coordinator for roadshows at Cadence and still does logistics for some of my startups. Her relatives are just a great family and are neighbors with Jack O’Neal [surfing entrepreneur and credited by many for inventing the wetsuit] who’s always donating to charities here.

Santa Cruz isn’t too far from the Valley, and I always have a lot of fun when we put these two crowds together, the surfers and the technology folks. For me, it’s kind of like the parties we had at my frat in college. You pick the day, buy the beer, and invite a bunch of people. [laughing] Maybe we’ve scaled up a little bit since then. Now my frat parties have a somewhat corporate feel.

CDNS: What a difference a year [or 2] makes
July 26, 2012  by Peggy Aycinena


We’re coming up on almost four years, full on, since the momentous events of 15 October 2008 when the entire top executive team at Cadence exited stage left.

At the time, of course, the world was paying a shade less attention to EDA, and a shade more attention to a global crisis unfolding minute-by-minute featuring household concepts such as bankruptcy, subprime mortgages, and derivatives, and household names such as Lehman Brothers, AIG, Merrill Lynch, Bank of America, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, Washington Mutual, JPMorgan, Wachovia, CitiGroup, and the FDIC, to name a few.

Meanwhile, the folks who held CDNS in mid-October 2008 were holding shares that had lost almost 80% of their value over the previous 12 months, plummeting from $20+/share to around $4/share in that time frame.

The world may have been consumed by news of the larger global meltdown in October 2008, but various CDNS shareholders were sufficiently focused on the disaster at Cadence to precipitate upwards of a dozen class-action suits against the company in protest.


As a follow-on to my June 21st blog regarding Electric Vehicles [EVs: an Electric Car in Every Garage], here are some additional notes of interest:

1 – An RC plane and car expert explained to me recently that if you want to follow the latest updates in battery technology, look to the RC marketplace. That market being full of avid hobbyists, it’s willing to embrace nascent technologies as early adopters.

The current technology that’s “hot” in RCs is the lithium polymer, or LiPo, battery. It’s still expensive, suffers from reduced shelf-life, and is reportedly more flammable than the lithium-ion battery technology currently installed in EVs, but the LiPo battery appears to offer “lighter weight and higher discharge rates” to power-hungry RC devices.

Per RCHelicopterFun.com: “In short, LiPo’s provide high energy storage to weight ratios in an endless variety of shapes and sizes.”

Thanks to the global RC user base, LiPo battery technology is enjoying intense research and deployment – not necessarily in that order – and may one day be widely utilized in the more “conventional” EV market. If the bugs can be worked out, the LiPo chemistry [possibly] stands to replace the “traditional” lithium-ion EV technology in years to come.

EDA & MCAD/MCAE Almanac – Parts I and II
July 20, 2012  by Dr. Russ Henke

Dear Faithful Reader: Please take a moment to be certain you have read these two connected messages.

The first one is the June 25, 2012 article entitled, “The EDA & MCAD/MCAE Almanac – Nominal Q1 2012″ at this URL:



The second is a special notice posted just yesterday July 19, 2012 in the EDACafe “Important Messages” section at this URL:



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