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Posts Tagged ‘x-propagation’

DO-254 Without Tears

Thursday, April 23rd, 2015

This article was originally published on TechDesignForums and is reproduced here by permission.

At first glance the DO-254 aviation standard, ‘Design Assurance Guideline for Airborne Electronic Hardware’, seems daunting. It defines design and verification flows tightly with regard to both implementation and traceability.

Here’s an example of the granularity within the standard: a sizeable block addresses how you write state machines, the coding style you use and the conformity of those state machines to that style.

This kind of stylistic, lower-level semantic requirement – and there are many within DO-254 – makes design managers stop and think. So it should. The standard is focused on aviation’s safety-critical demands, assessing the hardware design’s execution and functionality in appropriate depth right up to the consequences of a catastrophic failure.

Nevertheless, one pervasive and understandable concern has been the degree to which such a tightly-drawn standard will impact on and be compatible with established flows. This particularly goes for new entrants in avionics and its related markets.

Your company has a certain way of doing things so you inevitably wonder how easily that can be adapted and extended to meet the requirements of DO-254… or will a painful and expensive rethink be necessary? Can we realistically do this? (more…)

Billion Dollar Unicorns

Thursday, March 19th, 2015


Courtesy of Fortune Magazine, illustration by Jeremy Enecio.

The business magazine, Fortune, in a Feb. 2015 article proclaimed The Age of Unicorns  — private companies valued at more than $1 billion by investors. Unicorns are the stuff of myth, but billion-dollar tech start-ups seem to be everywhere, backed by a bull market and a new generation of disruptive technology.  According to a recent New York Times article, there are over 50 unicorns in Silicon Valley right now.

Upcoming unicorns formed a popular discussion topic at the Confluence 2015 conference organized by Zinnov, on March 12th in Santa Clara, Calif. The conference theme was “Building the Technology Organizations of Tomorrow”.

Here is a sampling of six unicorns that have emerged as real winners using innovative strategies: (more…)

Smarter Verification: Shift Mindset to Shift Left [Video]

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

The Design and Verification Conference Silicon Valley was held this week.  During Aart de Geus’ keynote, he shared how SoC verification is “shifting left”, so that debug starts earlier and results are delivered more quickly.   He identified a number of key technologies that have made this possible:

  • Static verification that uses a mix of specialized code analysis and formal technology which are must faster and more focused than traditional simulation
  • New third generation of analysis engines
  • Advancements in debug

Real Intent has also been talking about this new suite of technologies that improve the whole process of SoC verification.  Pranav Ashar, CTO at Real Intent wrote about these in a blog posted on the EETimes web-site.  Titled “Shifting Mindsets: Static Verification Transforms SoC Design at RT Level“, it introduces the idea of objective-driven verification:

We are at the dawn of a new age of digital verification for SoCs. A fundamental change is underway. We are moving away from a tool and technology approach — “I have a hammer, where are some nails?” — and toward a verification-objective mindset for design sign-off, such as “Does my design achieve reset in two cycles?”

Objective-driven verification at the RT level now is being accomplished using static-verification technologies. Static verification comprises deep semantic analysis (DSA) and formal methods. DSA is about understanding the purpose and intent of logic, flip-flops, state machines, etc. in a design, in the context of the verification objective being addressed. When this understanding is at the core of an EDA tool set, a major part of the sign-off process happens before the use or need of formal analysis. (more…)

It’s Time to Embrace Objective-driven Verification

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

This article was originally published on TechDesignForums and is reproduced here by permission.

Consider the Wall Street controversy over High Frequency Trading (HFT). Set aside its ethical (and legal) aspects. Concentrate on the technology. HFT exploits customized IT systems that allow certain banks to place ‘buy’ or ‘sell’ stock orders just before rivals, sometimes just milliseconds before. That tiny advantage can make enough difference to the share price paid that HFT users are said to profit on more than 90% of trades.

Now look back to the early days of electronic trading. Competitive advantage then came down to how quickly you adopted an off-the-shelf, one-size-fits-all e-trading package.


SoCcer: Defending your Digital Design

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

Weird things can happen during a presentation to a customer!

I was visiting a customer site giving an update on the latest release of our Ascent and Meridian products. It was taking place during the middle of the day, in a large meeting room, with more than 30 people in the audience. Everything seemed to be going smoothly.

Suddenly there was an uproar, with clapping and cheers coming from an adjacent break room. Immediately, everyone in my audience opened their laptops, and grinned or groaned at the football score.

The 2014 FIFA World Cup soccer championship game was in full swing!

As Germany scored at will against Brazil, I lost count of the reactions by the end of the match! The final score was a crushing 7-1.

It disturbed my presentation alright, but it also gave me some food for thought.

If I look at  SoC design as a SoCcer game, the bugs hiding in the design are like potential scores against us, the chip designers. We are defending our chip against bugs. Bugs could be related to various issues with design rules (bus contention), state machines (unreachable states, dead-codes), X-optimism (X propagating through x-sensitive constructs), clock domain crossing (re-convergence or glitch on asynchronous crossings), and so on.

Bugs can be found quickly, when the attack formation of our opponent is easy to see, or hard to find if the attack formation is very complex and well-disguised.

It is obvious that more goals will be scored against us if we are poorly prepared. The only way to avoid bugs (scores against us) is to build a good defense. What are some defenses we can deploy for successful chips?

We need to have design RTL that is free from design rule issues, free of deadlocks in its state machines, free from X-optimism and pessimism issues, and employs properly synchronized CDC for both data and resets and have proper timing constraints to go with it.

Can’t we simply rely on smart RTL design and verification engineers to prevent bugs? No, that’s only the first line of defense. We must have the proper tools and methodologies. Just like, having good players is not enough; you need a good defense strategy that the players will follow.

If you do not use proper tools and methodologies, you increase the risk of chip failure and a certain goal against the design team. That is like inviting penalty kick. Would you really want to leave you defense to the poor lone goal keeper? Wouldn’t you rather build methodology with multiple defense resources in play?

So what tools and methodologies are needed to prevent bugs? Here are some of the key needs:

  • RTL analysis (Linting) – to create RTL free of structural and semantic bugs
  • Clock domain crossing (CDC) verification – to detect and fix chip-killing CDC bugs
  • Functional intent analysis (also called auto-formal) – to detect and correct functional bugs well before the lengthy simulation cycle
  • X-propagation analysis – to reduce functional bugs due to unknowns X’s in the design and ensure correct power-on reset
  • Timing constraints verification – to reduce the implementation cycle time and prevent chip killer bugs due to bad exceptions

Proven EDA tools like Ascent Lint, Ascent IIV, Ascent XV, Meridian CDC and Meridian Constraints meet these needs effectively and keep bugs from crossing the mid-field of your design success.

Next time, you have no excuse for scores against you (i.e. bugs in the chip). You can defend and defend well using proper tools and methodologies.

Don’t let your chips be a defense-less victim like Brazil in that game against Germany! J

Executive Insight: On the Convergence of Design and Verification

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

This article was originally published on TechDesignForums and is reproduced here by permission.

Sometimes it’s useful to take an ongoing debate and flip it on its head. Recent discussion around the future of simulation has tended to concentrate on aspects best understood – and acted upon – by a verification engineer. Similarly, the debate surrounding hardware-software flow convergence has focused on differences between the two.

Pranav Ashar, CTO of Real Intent, has a good position from which to look across these silos. His company is seen as a verification specialist, particularly in areas such as lint, X-propagation and clock domain crossing. But talk to some of its users and you find they can be either design or verification engineers.

How Real Intent addresses some of today’s challenges – and how it got there – offer useful pointers on how to improve your own flow and meet emerging or increasingly complex tasks.


Static Verification Leads to New Age of SoC Design

Thursday, July 3rd, 2014

SoC companies are coming to rely on RTL sign-off of many verification objectives as a means to achieve a sensible division of labor between their RTL design team and their system-level verification team. Given the sign-off expectation, the verification of those objectives at the RT level must absolutely be comprehensive.

Increasingly, sign-off at the RTL level can be accomplished using static-verification technologies. Static verification stands on two pillars: Deep Semantic Analysis and Formal Methods. With the judicious synthesis of these two, the need for dynamic analysis (a euphemism for simulation) gets pushed to the margins. To be sure, dynamic analysis continues to have a role, but is increasingly as a backstop rather than the main thrust of the verification flow. Even where simulation is used, static methods play an important role in improving its efficacy.

Deep Semantic Analysis is about understanding the purpose or role of RTL structures (logic, flip-flops, state machines, etc.) in a design in the context of the verification objective being addressed. This type of intelligence is at the core of everything that Real Intent does, to the extent that it is even ingrained into the company’s name. Much of sign-off happens based just on the deep semantic intelligence in Real Intent’s tools without the invocation of classical formal analysis.


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