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Posts Tagged ‘clock domain crossing’

How Physical Implementation Can Break Your Clock-Domain Crossing Logic

Thursday, March 31st, 2016

At DVCon’16, Mark Litterick presented a paper and presentation on “Full Flow Clock Domain Crossing – From Source to Si.”   Here is the abstract for the paper:

Functional verification of clock domain crossing (CDC) signals is normally concluded on a register-transfer level (RTL) representation of the design. However, physical design implementation during the back-end pre-silicon stages of the flow, which turns the RTL into an optimized gate-level representation, can interfere with synchronizer operation or compromise the effectiveness of the synchronizers by eroding the mean time between failures (MTBF). This paper aims to enhance cross-discipline awareness by providing a comprehensive explanation of the problems that can arise in the physical implementation stages including a detailed analysis of timing intent for common synchronizer circuits.

Mark works for Verilab as senior verification consultant and holds the position of fellow. He is based in Munich, Germany.  To see more of Mark’s technical papers, check out his profile page on the Verilab web-site.

Even though, you may have signed-off for CDC at RTL, logic synthesis, design-for-test and low-power optimization tools can break CDC at the gate-level, the physical implementation stage of design. Real Intent’s Meridian products provide clock-domain crossing verification and sign-off.  Our most recent offering is Meridian Physical CDC and provides sign-off at the netlist level of the design.  It uses a mix of structural and formal methods to identify  glitching and other errors that break the correct registration of signals crossing clock domains. (more…)

Informal, Unformal, or Appformal? …and new

Thursday, March 10th, 2016

Around the Design and Verification Conference in San Jose at the beginning of the March, a lot of activity was happening in the online world in preparation for the big meetup of the verification community.

First, the web-site published a set of five (5) articles that surveyed the world of formal verification in EDA, written by Jim Hogan, of Vista Ventures, a Silicon Valley investment firm.  Jim is currently on the Board of OneSpin, a formal tools company.  Knowing Jim, he did his homework before getting involved with them.  If you read the articles, which total 12,000 words, you will have to agree with me there is a lot of great content here.  If a technical writer charged for producing this, you would be looking at a bill close to $20,000.

These days you have to two general ways to verify the functionality of your RTL with formal.  You either write your own properties and then feed them and the RTL to a formal property verifier (FPV) tool, OR you have an application-focused formal tool  automatically read and apply properties to your design.


CDC Verification of Fast-to-Slow Clocks – Part 3: Metastability Aware Simulation

Thursday, January 28th, 2016

We continue the short blog series that addresses the issue of doing clock domain crossing analysis where the clocks differ in frequency. In Part 1 and Part 2, we discussed the use of structural and formal checks when there is a fast-to-slow transition in a clock domain crossing. In this blog, we will present the third and final step using a design’s testbench.

The next step in the verification process of fast-to-slow clock domain crossings is to do metastability-aware simulation on the whole design. When running a regular simulation test bench, there is no concept of what could happen to the design if there was metastability present in the data or control paths within the design. One of the key reasons for doing CDC checks is to ensure that metastability does not affect a design. After structural analysis ensures that all crossings do contain synchronizers, and formal analysis ensures that the pulse width and data are stable, a whole-chip metastability-aware simulation is needed to see if the design is still sensitive to metastability. Functional monitors and metastability checkers are shown in Figure 7. No changes are made to the design, and the necessary monitors and checkers are written in an auxiliary Verilog simulation test bench file. This auxiliary file is simply referred to by the original simulation test bench file to invoke the metastability checking. As a prerequisite, this step requires that the design have a detailed simulation test bench. (more…)

CDC Verification of Fast-to-Slow Clocks – Part 2: Formal Checks

Thursday, January 21st, 2016

We continue the short blog series that addresses the issue of doing clock domain crossing analysis where the clocks differ in frequency. In Part 1, we ended the discussion noting that when there is a fast-to-slow transition, there is a possibility that a short duration control pulse may be completely missed by the receive domain and a formal analysis is required to discover if this is a potential problem. We will look at how formal analysis can verify this kind of transition.

A formal check also is required on a slow-to-fast data crossing with feedback. In such a circuit, as shown in Figure 4, an acknowledge signal coming from the receiving fast-clock domain to the transmitting slow-clock domain also requires a formal Pulse Width check. Although the control pulse (request) is going from slow to fast and does not need a formal pulse width check, the acknowledge pulse-width check is necessary because the acknowledge signal (the feedback circuit) is going from a fast to a slow clock and, in order for the acknowledge to be properly captured, the acknowledge pulse (transmitted from the receiving side) must be sufficiently wide to be captured (received on the transmitting side) by the slower clock domain of the transmitting side flops. Failure to check for this condition is the reason behind many a request/acknowledge circuit not working as expected. Note that feedback circuits in a fast-to-slow crossing are operating in a slow-to-fast mode and the acknowledge signal in such a circuit does not need to be pulse-width checked. In short, all fast-to-slow control signal transitions, whether connected in a feed-forward or a feedback manner need to be formally pulse-width checked to ensure integrity of the control aspect of the clock domain crossing. (more…)

CDC Verification of Fast-to-Slow Clocks – Part 1: Structural Checks

Thursday, January 14th, 2016

This is a reprise of  a short blog series that addresses the issue of doing clock domain crossing analysis where the clocks differ in frequency, and the use of three different techniques for a complete analysis.


CDC checking of any asynchronous clock domain crossing requires that the data path and the control path be identified and that the receive clock domain data flow is controlled by a multiplexer with a select line that is fed by a correctly synchronized control line.  Meridian CDC will always identify all the data and associated control paths in a design and will ensure that the control signals passing from a transmit clock domain to an asynchronous receive clock domain are correctly synchronized.  There are three separate techniques that are used within Meridian CDC: structural checking, formal checks and simulation-based injected metastability checks.


Video: “Why A New Gate-level CDC Verification Solution?”

Thursday, November 19th, 2015

Recently, I interviewed Vikas Sachdeva, Sr. Technical Marketing Manager at Real Intent where we discusse why gate-level CDC verification is necessary, what are some of the failure modes that can occur, and why Meridian Physical CDC is the right tool to do gate-level sign-off. You can see the video below.  You can also find more information about Meridian Physical CDC here.

Click here to watch other Real Intent videos on our YouTube Channel.

DAC Verification Survey: What’s Hot and What’s Not

Thursday, October 15th, 2015

At the Design Automation Conference in San Francisco, Real Intent did a survey of 201 visitors to our booth.  We focused on RTL and gate-level verification issues.  Below is a brief introduction and you can see the entire survey on the web-site.

DAC’15 “When is your next design start?”

0-3 months : ########################################### (52%)
3-6 months : ###################### (26%)
6-12 months: ################## (22%)

These numbers are very similar to what was reported in 2012 on DeepChip. With half of the future design starts occurring in the next 3 months, this leads me to think design activity is remaining strong despite any EDA user consolidation we might have seen with the big mergers of various chip companies, and the slowing of the Chinese economy. However, the latest IC forecast from Gartner has 2015 growth falling from 5.4% at the beginning of 2015 down to 2.2% in July.

On-the-Fly Hardware Accurate Simulation, New Meridian CDC, ASICON Tutorial

Thursday, October 8th, 2015

In this blog, we are presenting the highlights from Real Intent’s Fall 2015 Verification Newsletter. First are some thoughts from Prakash Narain, CEO, followed by an introduction to the new 2015 release of Meridian CDC for clock-domain and reset-domain crossing sign-off, and finally a review of our fall events including an ASICON tutorial.

Thoughts From Prakash Narain, President and CEO…

Most functional verification for SoC and FPGA designs is done prior to RTL hand-off to digital synthesis, since gate-level simulations take longer to complete and are significantly harder to debug.  However, gate-level simulations are still needed to verify some circuit behavior.  Unfortunately, X’s in gate-level simulations can cause differences in the RTL simulation output and the gate-level simulation output.  X’s generally exist in all designs – it can be difficult to prevent this for practical reasons.  Simulation results may be different because of X’s that are hidden in the RTL simulation by X-optimism, or additional X’s may exist due to X-pessimism in gate-level simulations. Pessimism can be fixed by overriding the simulator because you know that real hardware would always resolve to a deterministic value. The challenge is confirming that the X value is a result of X-pessimism and not simply X-propagation, and then forcing it to the right value at the right point in time so the simulation matches that of real hardware.


Technology Errors Demand Netlist-level CDC Verification

Thursday, July 30th, 2015

Multiple asynchronous clocks are a fact of life on today’s SoC. Individual blocks have to run at different speeds so they can handle different functional and power payloads efficiently, and the ability to split clock domains across the SoC has become a key part of timing-closure processes, isolating clock domains to subsections of the device within which traditional skew-control can still be used.

As a result, clock domain crossing (CDC) verification is required to ensure logic signals can pass between regions controlled by different clocks without being missed or causing metastability. Traditionally, CDC verification has been carried out on RTL descriptions on the basis that appropriate directives inserted in the RTL will ensure reliable data synchronizers are inserted into the netlist by synthesis. But a number of factors are coming together that demand a re-evaluation of this assumption.

A combination of process technology trends and increased intervention by synthesis tools in logic generation, both intended to improve power efficiency, is leading to a situation in which a design that is considered CDC-clean at RTL can fail in operation. Implementation tools can fail to take CDC into account and unwittingly increase the chances of metastability. (more…)

Video: SoC Requirements and “Big Data” are Driving CDC Verification

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

Just before the design automation conference in June, I interviewed Sarath Kirihennedige and asked him about the drivers for clock-domain crossing (CDC) verification of highly integrated SoC designs, and the requirements for handling the “big data” that this analysis produces.  He discusses these trends and how the 2015 release of Meridian CDC from Real Intent meets this challenge.

He does this in under 5 minutes!   You can see it right here…

S2C: FPGA Base prototyping- Download white paper

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