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Posts Tagged ‘Cadence’

EDAC Seminar: EDA & Export Compliance

Thursday, September 26th, 2013


EDAC hosted an evening seminar last week that could have taught you everything your company needs to know to meet your Export Compliance requirements – an unbelievably labyrinthine set of rules, created and nurtured by various agencies of the U.S. Government, that are designed in part to prevent sensitive technical IP from falling into the hands of less-than-totally-friendly nation states.

If you weren’t there on September 18th, you were not alone. A surprisingly small number of people showed up for the seminar, although the speaker, Cadence Group Director for Export Compliance and Government Relations Larry Disenhof, is clearly a walking encyclopedia on this stuff, and although EDAC did a great job publicizing the event.

If you didn’t attend EDA & Export Compliance, it was probably for one of two reasons:  Your team already knows everything they need to know in order to meet their export obligations, or your team is oblivious to the fact that these requirements are not optional; they’re obligatory and failure to comply can precipitate fines of $250,000 and up, loss of export privileges, cancellation of pending M&A’s, and even jail time.


Future of IP: from Tensilica to IPextreme

Thursday, August 1st, 2013


Bill Martin, President/VP of Engineering at E-System Design, has sent another thoughtful response to a blog regarding IP, in particular my post last week about the astonishing increase in the valuation of ARMH over the last 5 years.


Years ago, Chris Rowen had a clear vision where EDA and IP would start to merge, given the complexities of both. He knew both could have a large impact on the resources and risks associated with creating an SoC. His vision was so compelling, Chris resigned from a great group within Synopsys to form his start-up, Tensilica.

At the time, EDA/IP/Customization were all difficult problems to resolve. By building larger blocks that automatically reconfigured and combined other aspects (examples: SW compiler/debugger for code that could add/delete instructions and a verification suite that reconfigured themselves based customers’ usage), the solution Chris created at Tensilica addressed SIP/Embedded SW/VIP and EDA.

Quite an ambitious undertaking, but over time as his solution was honed and matured, the industry saw the end result – a few months ago the large acquisition of Tensilica by Cadence. In fact, the deal was part of a trend. Look at the various EDA and IP acquisitions since 2008, those exceeding $100 million:


SIP: And in other news …

Thursday, April 11th, 2013


Years ago, an editor/mentor advised me never to cover legal battles between companies in this industry. He’d always say, “There’s no good to be had from covering this stuff. The story’s always so much more complicated than anybody every fesses up to, so just don’t go there.”

So, how about this? Shall we accentuate the positive and decentuate the negative? You think that’s stupid, naive, not gritty enough? Well, y’all know where to go if you want to accentuate the negative and decentuate the positive. Y’all know where to go if you want the rumors and innuendo.

If, however, you’d rather start off your week with something a bit more upbeat, stick around.


M&A: CDNS + Tensilica = win/win

Tuesday, March 12th, 2013


As the trading day in New York draws to a close, it would appear that some analysts are correct; the market’s not too pleased about yesterday’s announcement that Cadence is acquiring Tensilica. Shares of CDNS are trading down well over 3% today. But you know, the market’s stupid. They understand zip zero nada about EDA or IP, and really why should they?

After all, EDA and IP providers make the black magic that they do look so easy. And, they’re constantly telling people that what they do isn’t rocket science. But it is! The EDA vendors make the tools that IP vendors use to create their products, and designers use to integrate said IP into the larger designs. It’s called an eco-system and it is rocket science.

It’s also on the level of brain surgery, quantum physics, and a bunch of other esoteric science and engineering disciplines that require a lot of education and and a lot of OJT, and even then is really hard to do. How many traders on Wall Street, or the analysts who track it all, really understand what EDA and/or IP are all about? Exactly!


EDAC CEO Panel: Does ARM control the conversation?

Thursday, February 28th, 2013


If you’re free on the evening of Thursday, March 14th, you should plan on attending EDAC’s annual CEO Forecast Panel. It promises to be full of executive content, albeit perhaps a bit light on forecast content, but oh well. That’s the nature of life in the Publicly Traded Fast Lane these days.

Along with the CEOs of Mentor Graphics, Cadence, Synopsys, and Nimbic, the president of ARM will also be on stage, Simon Segars. Segars is no stranger to public speaking. You can hear his recent ARM TechCon 2012 keynote here. But it’s not what Segars will say on stage at the DoubleTree Hotel in San Jose on March 14th that matters. It’s his body language, and you’ll only be able to read that if you’re in the room.


Using SIP: How they know what they know

Thursday, February 14th, 2013


After the euphoniously monikered IP provider, Uniquify, announced several weeks ago that the more whimsically monikered organization, Pixelworks, is using Uniquify’s DDR memory controller subsystem IP for multiple distinct processors that Pixelworks is, in turn, providing to TV makers who make 4Kx2K ultra high-def systems, one question still remained: How did Pixelworks know to use Uniquify’s offering?

According to a January 2013 article in IEEE Spectrum, knowing what IP to use in a project here in the 21st century is fairly easy knowledge to come by. I don’t know what planet the author of the op-ed piece, “Other People’s Knowledge”, lives on but it doesn’t seem to be the one that I hear about from the folks who make or buy third-party IP.

In fact, those people seem to indicate that knowing what IP to use in a particular project continues to be far more art than science. In particular, because until a system, or sub-system, is fully defined, modeled and simulated – let alone, manufactured and deployed in the field – one can never really know how a piece of IP is going to work in the environment into which it’s been placed.


M&A: Cadence to acquire Cosmic Circuits

Thursday, February 7th, 2013


Interesting news this week that Cadence will be acquiring Cosmic Circuits, interesting because Cosmic Circuits is “a provider of analog/mixed-signal IP cores in the 40nm and 28nm process nodes, with 20nm and FinFET development well underway.”

Great idea to keep expanding into IP for any EDA company, but does this move put Cadence in direct competition with its own customers? No problem, per the February 7th Press Release: “The addition of the Cosmic Circuits product line will broaden the Cadence IP portfolio, strengthening its solutions to address mobile device, cloud/datacenter and Internet of Things market opportunities.”


Hal Barbour: Master of the mega-trend

Thursday, August 30th, 2012


Hal Barbour is President of CAST, an IP company based on the East Coast. Hal has a tremendous ability to explain the many facets of the industry, and it was a great pleasure to sit down and talk with him this week. When we spoke by phone on August 29th, he had just wrapped up an earlier call with a customer.

Hal Barbour on All things IP …

Q: How do you make yourself known to customers?

Hal Barbour: We have always put a lot of information in the hands of our customers, but the delivery mechanism today is quite a bit different. We’ve learned to leverage most of the contemporary tools – blogs, online meetings, webinars, shows and press releases. Press releases are just as important as ever, but where we used to send them to a central distribution center and a group of editors, now there are about 15 or 20 various people and outlets who disseminate the information to a much larger population.

Q: And how do working engineers hear about the products?

Hal Barbour: That’s the really interesting thing. Engineers today can easily see press releases directly, plus they have at their disposal a powerful set of search tools to help them get the information they need, so whatever information you’re putting out there, it better be right and it better be credible. If it’s not, engineers have got plenty of other sources to turn to.

And if you’re going to be out there, you better be able to respond to inquiries quickly and rapidly. Ultimately, however, it’s your name and your reputation that sells products. I can’t tell you the number of people who contact us based on our name and reputation.

Q: Isn’t that called ‘word of mouth’?

Hal Barbour: That’s exactly what it is, only it’s even faster today. Spreading the word used to be limited by who you knew, but today with social media and blogs, word of mouth moves at lighting speed and is more important than ever. Even today, though, nothing substitutes for face-to-face contact with the customer.


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