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Anne Cirkel
Anne Cirkel
Anne Cirkel is the General Chair for the 52nd DAC and a Senior Director for Technology Marketing at Mentor Graphics. Prior to joining Mentor Anne held marketing management positions at Analogy, Viewlogic, and Berner & Mattner. Anne holds a Master's degree in Business Administration with an … More »

If you build it…

 
October 27th, 2014 by Anne Cirkel

Okay, this is no hyperbole and I’m no longer just trying to gin up enthusiasm. The first batch of DAC deadlines is upon us. For those of you who won’t read beyond this paragraph, here are dates you need to know if you’re interested in participating in what remains the premier EDA industry conference. Proposals for the following are due November 13: panels, tutorials, workshops and co-located conferences. Abstracts for research papers are due November 21 and full manuscripts are due December 2; you can submit in these five categories: automotive electronic design, EDA research, ESS research, hardware software and security, and work-in-progress (WIP). I hope all those links help. Of course you can find more information and everything else you need on DAC.com.

This is an exciting and slightly nerve wracking time in the planning cycle of the conference. Given DAC’s stature, great industry participation is all but assured. However, anyone who has ever helped organize a conference or even a big holiday party knows there is some anxiety about whether people will show. Remember Kevin Costner hearing that voice in the Iowa cornfield in “Field of Dreams”? (Pardon the baseball reference, but it seems appropriate with the World Series underway and San Francisco’s hometown team competing.) Well, we’ve built the foundation for a great conference and now we’re waiting for people to come — or in this case, to get their submissions in on time.


YouTube DirektIf you build it, he will come.

The DAC executive committee has already made a few treks of their own to be together face-to-face. The most recent example was our meeting in Portland several weeks ago to begin hammering out details about DAC 52 in earnest. You can read my brief accounts of the meeting in my week 16 and 17 posts to my 52 Weeks of DAC blog. No jokes about sausage making here. I think of DAC more as a great meal, one reason why I decided to scrap the idea of hitting Portland’s much ballyhooed restaurant scene in favor of preparing a gourmet meal ourselves. It was fun and helped to foster the camaraderie and teamwork we’ll need to pull off a great conference next summer in San Francisco. Plus, now photos of several senior EDA types on the executive committee members donning kitchen aprons are floating around the internet, thanks to several posts on my DAC blog.

We ate well that night and I can promise that those of you interested in consuming cutting-edge EDA content will be comfortably sated by the time DAC 52 wraps up. One reason I’m sure is that we remain committed to offering an impressive breadth of content. It bears repeating that nearly a third of the conference will be devoted to embedded systems and software (ESS), a ratio that’s held steady for the past several years. This year for the first time we have a dedicated ESS chair on the executive committee. It’s Freescale’s Rob Oshana and you can learn more about him, and watch him in a short video, in my week 18 post.

DAC 52 will be loaded with opportunities, particularly for engineers looking to learn from their colleagues. Check out my week 19 post for details on the designer track. Its status as an independent, marketing-free forum for engineers makes it unique in a world where vendor-sponsored conferences are ascendant. The fact that submission requirements are simple and brief — you just need to send us a title, short abstract and six slides by November 13 — means that designer track participation is easy.

Oh, and about marketing at DAC. Certainly the conference is a good opportunity to reach out to journalists, many of whom still come to the show despite the well-known travails of the trade press. Indeed with the rise social media, nearly anyone can act as a reporter, though more than occasionally the results are mixed. In my week 20 post, I give my take on the right and wrong way to get the most PR mileage out of DAC.

I know that to make it to DAC some of you will travel a long way, both in terms of work on your submissions and miles to the Moscone Center. I can assure you that it will be worth it, just like it was for those who made it to Costner’s Iowa baseball diamond. I’ll be watching for your headlights — and your submissions.


YouTube DirektPeople will come.

Message Sent (go back)

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