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Posts Tagged ‘systemverilog’

Acceleration-Ready UVM Webinar with Doulos and Aldec

Wednesday, April 6th, 2016

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Doulos CTO, John Aynsley, and I will be presenting a free 1 hour training  webinar, Acceleration-Ready UVM, on Wednesday April 13th, 2016. Learn more in this guest blog by John Aynsley, excerpted from the Aldec Design and Verification Blog.

Acceleration-Ready UVM 

by Doulos CTO, John Aynsley

We hear that emulation is one of the fastest-growing segments in EDA right now, yet simulation still continues to be the main workhorse for functional verification, and SystemVerilog and UVM are everywhere you look. But how do you combine the two? How do you run a UVM-based constrained random verification environment alongside an emulator and get reasonable execution speed?

 

Many vendors have solutions, including Aldec with their HES-DVM™ emulator. Their solution is based on the Accellera SCE-MI standard, and in particular on SV-Connect, which is a function-based interface that uses the SystemVerilog DPI (Direct Programming Interface) to pass information between the host and the emulator. You partition your UVM drivers and monitors into two parts, a small proxy that remains on the host and a synthesizable implementation that goes into the emulator. That way, all of the low-level timing detail is removed from the UVM code running on the host and is placed in the emulator, where it belongs. The communication between the host and the emulator can be optimized to avoid the emulator being stalled while waiting for the slower UVM simulation running on the host.

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Why I see C in SCE-MI

Friday, March 18th, 2016

blog_img_scemi_022416The two questions I hear most often while doing presentations about SCE-MI transaction based emulation are “Can we have coffee break?” and “Why do we need a thin C layer between two SystemVerilog tops”?

You a probably reading this during a coffee break, so let’s jump to second question. It refers to this diagram showing how to connect a SystemVerilog testbench (usually UVM) with DUT in SystemVerilog using a DPI transactor, as defined by the Function-based.

 

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UVM. It’s Organized and Systematic.

Wednesday, February 10th, 2016

The-fundamentals-of-UVMOne of the reasons I like using UVM is its tendency toward an organized structure and uniformity. Some may find it annoying to adhere to such a strict format in UVM, but I think it’s a good way to keep the basics of UVM engrained in your brain. You always want a good foundation and development of strong fundamentals in any endeavor. Verification is no different and UVM hammers the fundamentals home.

 

UVM has a great structure and organization paradigm. I consider there to be two distinct and fundamental elements in the UVM structure: Components and Objects. Now this characterization isn’t strictly correct because uvm_components are extended from uvm_objects, but I think they are used in such a way that warrants the distinction. I consider it similar to the idea of trucks and cars. In my view, trucks are also cars, but it’s useful to note the difference.

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Verifying Large FPGAs Isn’t Easy

Tuesday, December 15th, 2015

FPGA designers using VHDL have three choices: Stick with VHDL, switch to SystemVerilog, or.. use the best of both. This guest blog from Doug Perry, Senior Member Technical Staff at Doulos, outlines the pros and cons of each.

The latest crop of FPGA devices are enormous when compared to ASICs that were built not that long ago. Verifying these ASICs required detailed plans, multiple tools, and sometimes special languages. Verification was key because the cost of a respin was prohibitive.  FPGA designers using VHDL have three choices: Stick with VHDL, switch to SystemVerilog, or.. use the best of both. This guest blog from Doug Perry, Senior Member Technical Staff at Doulos, outlines the pros and cons of each.

The same is not necessarily true of FPGAs because they can simply be re-programmed when an error is found. However the cost of finding the error in the lab can still be very expensive. This is related to the fact that the number of LUTs available in the device has skyrocketed, but the number of IO pins has not. Therefore getting visibility into the inner workings of the device from outside becomes much more difficult. Finding the source of an error therefore also becomes increasingly difficult. To counteract this problem, designers need to find errors before the device gets into the lab. To do this they need to adopt ASIC-like verification methodologies.

‘Don’t Be Afraid of UVM’ Webinar on YouTube

Tuesday, October 27th, 2015

uvm_img_102715Just in time for Halloween, Aldec has released a popular past webinar Don’t be Afraid of UVM for Hardware Designers on YouTube.

Designers are usually very busy doing their work and have little time left for experimentation with new methodologies. Unfortunately for them, official documentation of UVM (Universal Verification Methodology) was written by Verification Engineers for Verification Engineers, concentrating on high-level features and completely neglecting lower-level details such as connecting UVM testbench to your design.

Our webinar starts with solid review of SystemVerilog interfaces with special attention paid to Virtual Interfaces. Then it proceeds to Sequences and other Data Items, processed by Sequencers and fed to the design under test via Drivers. The role of Monitors and Scoreboards in analysis of results is explained. The presentation concludes with environment configuration and running test from the top-level module.

For the rest of this article, visit the Aldec Design and Verification Blog.

Integrating SystemVerilog and SCE-MI for Faster Emulation Speed

Wednesday, October 9th, 2013

In the last SCE-MI article, we discussed how SCE-MI macro-based infrastructures can speedup SoC design verification time. In SCE-MI 2.1, Accelera introduced a ‘function-based’ infrastructure which is based on SystemVerilog DPI functionality. The SystemVerilog DPI is an interface which can be used to connect SystemVerilog files with foreign languages (C, C++, SystemC, etc).

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Why Randomize?

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

Jim Lewis, VHDL Training Expert at SynthWorks (and founding member of OSVVM, which Aldec was an early adopter of) was kind enough to author a guest blog for Aldec. Here’s an excerpt:

After presenting a conference paper on how to do OSVVM-style constrained random and intelligent coverage (randomization based on functional coverage holes), I received  a great question, “Why Randomize?”

The easiest way to answer this is with an example.  Let’s look at a FIFO test – test a FIFO, write to it, read from it, write to it and read from it simultaneously, fill it and see that additional writes are held off successfully, and empty it and see that additional reads are held off successfully. 

Most certainly a FIFO can be tested using a directed test (just code, no randomization).  The following simulation waveform shows diffcount (the number of words in the FIFO) for a directed test.   The lowest value is empty.  The highest is full.  Using this, you can visually check off all of the required conditions and see that the FIFO is indeed tested.

For the rest of this article, visit the Aldec Design and Verification Blog.

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